e-feminism

12 Oct

There are some good magazines out there…  online though.

I bringing close to you two here. Some of you might be aware of them already.

On the one hand:

Feministtimes

 “Where have all the interesting women gone? And what has happened to all the interesting magazines? Feminist Times is a PR, advertising and celebrity free magazine aimed at interesting women. Our 3D feminism will result in our members meeting regularly and together we will campaign. Who knows where it will take us? LIFE NOT LIFESTYLE”

Feminist Times | LIFE NOT LIFESTYLE

And on the other hand :

Femusings

“A literary cocktail of the polemic, the factual and the comical, it was rumoured that Femusings sprung out of a top-secret government initiative, funded by the G20. The project was, in reality, spawned as the love-child of two university chums and launched at the end of July, 2013.

We’re seeking politically-minded sexpots for intellectual tickling and cerebral stimulation. Must have G.S.O.H, strong stomach, and an insatiable curiosity. In return, we’ll give you steamy nights of intellectual passion, hearty meals of gender-equality sustenance and some pork scratchings on the side.

Femuse.”

Home | FEMUSINGS…

I hope you enjoy them!

Male Feminists

11 Oct

soc140blog

Tracy Castaneda

                In the article “Feminism Needs Men, Too” http://www.policymic.com/articles/41655/feminism-needs-men-too, author Lauren Rankin, Feminist activist and writer, speaks about the true meaning of Feminism  refereeing to it as “a movement that is meant to eradicate gendered oppression,  and that challenges  constructed gender norms including male dominance and privilege “ her main goal is to encourage men to join the movement emphasizing that it is in fact essential to have male involvement; for Feminism does not only concern women but, men as well. Throughout time society has continued to misconstrue what a Feminist really is? Many assume that to be a Feminist means that you are a power hungry woman, who hates men and who does not shave and other highly unlikely presumptions. When in all actuality to be a Feminist means that you are looking to even out the playing field for both men and women primarily seeking…

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Access to safe and legal abortion

4 Oct

Every woman has the right to life, dignity, bodily integrity, personal liberty, privacy, self-determination, the highest level of reproductive health, and the right to live free from violence and discrimination. In countries where abortion is criminalised or otherwise restricted by laws, economic, physical, and cultural barriers, women are systematically denied their basic human rights.


Full text of the Call for Action, here

WGNRR Call for Action on September 28 | September 28 Campaign

 

7 Phrases Most Feminist Despise

3 Oct

Usually what I do is rebloging, but since this case I could not, I had just copy and paste from here:

http://slcfeminist.com/7-phrases-most-feminists-despise/

this post:

7 Phrases Most Feminists Despise

October 1, 2013 by  

i'm not a feminist but...1. You must be a lesbian.

I might be a lesbian. I might be pansexual, genderqueer, bisexual, asexual, heterosexual, etc. My sexuality doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with my political ideology. Unless I’m a political lesbian, but you wouldn’t understand.

2. So, you don’t think men and women are different at all?

Actually, I think people are different in so many ways. I think that people are nuanced, and should be judged according to their skills, talents, and actions. I don’t think you should make assumptions based on someone’s presupposed gender. And let’s be honest, I’m not very thrilled that you still only think that this world is made up of two distinct categories of people. Amiright?

3. Why do you hate men?

I don’t hate men. Some of the best people in my life identify as men. I hate a system that privileges certain men over all others, while simultaneously constraining other men for behavior that isn’t congruent with heteronormative values.

4. Any statement where the word “misandry” is used seriously.

Seriously. Just stop it.

5. What does [insert “ism” here] have to do with feminism?

Someone once asked me what disability had to do with feminism, and I felt like the Internet needed to shut down for the day. I wanted to yell at the person for being so fucking stupid, but then I remembered that some real asshats pretend to fly the Feminist Flag, and I sort of calmed down. For the record y’all,  feminism, feminism that is worth anything, is all about intersectionality. That means that feminists are concerned with sexism and: racism, heterosexism, ableism, classism, etc., etc., etc.

6. I’m not a feminist. I’m a humanist.

It would be hypocritical of me to blast you for the way you identify. I don’t care if you identify as a bisexual panda, it’s no skin off my back, but you don’t need to be a prick about it. Saying “I’m a humanist” is awesome, it usually means we’re going to be friends, but the scathing, derisive, dripping “I’m not a feminist” that precedes or follows your declaration is just unnecessary.

7. I’m kind of a feminist.

This one just hurts because we’re so close to being friends. You’re telling me this because you’re in good damn company, so embrace it. Wrap yourself up in the feminist label and get comfortable, because I’m not the person you need to placate with your qualifiers. You are a feminist, so stop pretending, and let’s go drinking and smash the patriarchy.

 

FEMINIST REVIEW

2 Oct
Essay time (Postmodern Feminism): My Floor

Essay time (Postmodern Feminism): My Floor (Photo credit: tim.riley)

 

For those of you whom are interested in exploring Feminism at the academic level here is a very useful resource :

 

” Feminist Review is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal setting new agendas for feminism. Feminist Review invites critical reflection on the relationship between materiality and representation, theory and practice, subjectivity and communities, contemporary and historical formations. The FR Collective is committed to exploring gender in its multiple forms and interrelationships.

 

Feminist Review resists the increasing instrumentalisation of scholarship within British and international higher education and thus supports the generation of creative and innovative approaches to knowledge production. As well as academic articles we publish experimental pieces, visual and textual media and political interventions, including, for example, interviews, short stories, poems and photographic essays”

 

Find more about at < Feminist Review >

 

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