Archive | February, 2013

Feminists can be sexy and funny – but it’s anger that changes the world | Ellie Mae O’Hagan | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk

28 Feb
Betty Friedan, American feminist and writer.

Betty Friedan, American feminist and writer. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Article by Ellie Mae O’Hagan, for the Guardian.

 

Here is a small extraction from her article, you can read all in the link bellow :

 

” At its core, feminism should be angry. It should be angry because women are still being taken for a ride. Like the women in The Feminine Mystique, we are being sold a lie of equality in a society where the odds are politically, socially and economically stacked against us.

 

Sexy, funny feminism is inspired by the fear that feminism will never get anywhere unless it is likeable. For a long time now, feminists have been told that their message will never spread to the masses if the messenger appears to be an angry man-hating lesbian shouting the odds from a gender studies seminar room. But we need to realise that popular, non-threatening feminism is destined for failure as well. In a patriarchy – and if you are a feminist, you accept that we are living in one – what is popular and non-threatening is what men deem to be acceptable.

 

When feminists decide they want to appeal to everybody, what they are really doing is attempting to appeal to men, as culture in a patriarchy is defined by male values and male norms. Feminism that prioritises popularity over its own integrity will necessarily fail, as it is bound to reproduce the very problems it is fighting against.

 

Feminism’s most basic function should be to emphasise that sexism is not an accident, but an inevitable consequence of a society structured to favour men.”

 

Feminists can be sexy and funny – but it’s anger that changes the world | Ellie Mae O’Hagan | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk.

 

 

 

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27 Feb

As I consider this statement to be so great I copied here the first half of it, follow the link to read it all.

 

Posted on In Defense of Feminism for Men | Being Feminist

 

This article was written by Jesse Game-Brown

 

“Why are you a feminist?” is a difficult question to answer—not because of a lack of justifications but because there are so very many. The question does not always take the direct form for me but is often detectable in a sideways glance in response to my Women’s Studies education or my involvement with a feminist blog. The question is discernable nonetheless, the curiosity exacerbated for some because I am a man.

Coming from men, the question does not always take the form of “Why are you a feminist?” From men the question sometimes presents as “Why as a man do you use the term feminism and not something like egalitarianism?”

Well, I firmly believe it’s true that men and women alike are all hapless gears in the gender binary machine. And I like the term egalitarianism and its objective, but to me the term seems insufficient in the context of gender. I prefer the term feminism for the following basic reasons:

1) Most pertinently, femininity, from which the term is derived, is generally undervalued in both men and women. Men are forbidden from partaking in anything associated with the feminine; and women are simultaneously expected to emulate femininity and reject it.

2) Ungendered bodies are almost ubiquitously read as male. Ask any first grader the gender of a ghost or spider in a storybook to demonstrate this internalized pattern. Any creature in a video game is a him. Maleness or masculinity can be neutral and natural; femaleness and femininity are necessarily unusual and otherly.

3)Systemically, men are still in power. Despite some, some, encouraging signs, we remain, predominantly, a patriarchy. The gender associated with femininity is yet marginalized.

4)Discourse about gender and the binary system began in the women’s rights movement. Gender reform has a long, exceptional history of discourse and activism under the name of feminism.

….

more at

In Defense of Feminism for Men | Being Feminist

Being Feminist

This article was written by Jesse Game-Brown

“Why are you a feminist?” is a difficult question to answer—not because of a lack of justifications but because there are so very many. The question does not always take the direct form for me but is often detectable in a sideways glance in response to my Women’s Studies education or my involvement with a feminist blog. The question is discernable nonetheless, the curiosity exacerbated for some because I am a man.

Coming from men, the question does not always take the form of “Why are you a feminist?” From men the question sometimes presents as “Why as a man do you use the term feminism and not something like egalitarianism?”

Well, I firmly believe it’s true that men and women alike are all hapless gears in the gender binary machine. And I like the term egalitarianism and its objective, but to me…

View original post 865 more words

27 Feb

Fit and Feminist

Several years ago, while researching gender in the early Catholic church for a college class, I read a book called Eunuchs for the Kingdom of Heaven.  In it, the author describes the way boys were taken from their homes when they were really young and put into monasteries, where they only had contact with other men.  The men would then teach the boys about women, specifically that women were craven, lustful beasts who were destroyers of all that was righteous and holy.  The boys, never having had contact with women aside from long-distant memories of their mothers, would absorb these teachings as fact, then grow up and teach the next generation of boys to fear women and to view them as little more than monsters.

I think of this passage often when I encounter articles that purport to “explain” women, like we are some great anthropological mystery that needs…

View original post 1,749 more words

Chocolates without guilt … yummy!!

23 Feb

Chocolates

Extracted from: Gay Start News article by Jack Flanagan.

A trans UK student has started a campaign aiming to combat anti-LGBT bullying and depression with chocolate.

The aim is to raise awareness of bullying, both transgender and LGBT, by making these diverse chocolates.

Workman is setting up her own chocolate company, but with all profits going to anti-bullying charities.

Lily’s Chocolate Anti-Bullying Campaign! | Indiegogo

73% of trans people surveyed experienced some form of harassment in public (ranging from comments and verbal abuse to physical violence)

21% stated that they avoided going out because of fear of harassment

46% stated that they had experienced harassment in their neighbourhoods

64% of young trans men and 44% of young trans women experienced harassment or bullying at school, not just from their fellow pupils but also from school staff including teachers

28% stated that they had moved to a different neighbourhood because of their transition.

Help support our anti-bullying campaign, and let us try and make a difference! Get some of our wonderful chocolate here: (including our trans chocolate, or rainbow chocolate)

Lily’s Chocolate Anti-Bullying Campaign! | Indiegogo

 

I already ordered mine and I can’t wait to have them delivered!!!

Related articles

 

8th of March – THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN THE ARAB SPRING – YOU ARE INVITED!

22 Feb

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Feminists of Westminster Unite Society is delighted to invite you to the panel discussion about the role of women in the Arab Spring.

What was the role of women during the uprisings? What has changed? What are the reasons behind recent outbreaks of violence against women in Egypt? How does this violence affect women’s participation in the political domain? What are the prospects for the future? These and other questions will be addressed by our speakers at this fascinating and informative event.
Our speakers are – Dr Maria Holt from University of Westminster, Dr Anne Alexander from humanities research centre at the University of Cambridge, and Joshua Rogers from Saferworld organisation.

Dr Maria Holt is a Senior Lecturer in the Democracy and Islam Programme. Her focus first is on experience of Palestinian refugee women in Lebanon and on the impact of Islamic resistance movements on women in Lebanon and the Palestinian territories. Her other research interests include the Arab-Israeli conflict, Muslim communities in the UK, political Islamist movements in the Middle East, and the final years of the British colonial period in southern Yemen. Her recent work has been on violence against women in the context of conflict in the Middle East. Maria will talk about her research and relate it to cases of the violence being experienced by women during the Arab uprisings.

Dr Anne Alexander is a researcher from humanities centre CRASSH at the University of Cambridge. The focus of her research is on leadership, collective action and social movements in the Middle East; Anne is particularly interested in Egypt, Iraq and Syria post-1945 and labour movements across the region. She is currently developing ‘a project which will investigate the relationship between the dissemination of new media technologies and mobilisation for political change in the Middle.

Joshua Rogers is a Project Leader from Saferworld organisation. He is currently involved in the ‘Gender, peace and security’ project in Libya, Egypt and Yemen. He has a lot of experience working with women activists in all three countries. Joshua has been leading the research project on how perceptions of safety and security affect women’s ability to participate in the political domain (this research will inform the UK’s Preventing Sexual Violence initiative).

External students and individuals will need to register at least two days in advance for university security reasons. Please email your name to Feminist.soc@su.westminster.ac.uk with ‘Women and the Arab Spring’ in the subject field.

Facebook event page http://www.facebook.com/vlasenko.alesya#!/events/430294310383366/

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